7 reasons why Dorset is one of the best places to live in the UK

7 reasons why Dorset is one of the best places to live in the UK

7 reasons why Dorset is one of the best places to live in the UK

With our bustling seaside towns, miles of spectacular coastline, quaint villages and a rich cultural heritage, Dorset is a highly appealing area to lay down roots.
In recent years the County has gained a significant boost in population and it’s not hard to see why…

  • Our stunning coastline - Dorset boasts plenty of picturesque beaches and nearly 100 miles of rugged coastline, from Bournemouth and Weymouth to Swanage and the hugely popular Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door. Studies have shown that Dorset receives a whopping 364 more hours of sunny weather compared to other British counties so it’s not surprising that its many beaches are an attractive tourist destination. Many of the coastal bays are watersports friendly, drawing in sailors, windsurfers, kitesurfers, kayakers and paddleboarders from across the UK.
  • The Jurassic Coast- a UNESCO World Heritage Site - Known across the globe as one of the richest heritage sites for prehistoric remains and the only natural World Heritage Site in England, the Jurassic Coast features 95 miles of breathtaking cliffs, bays and beaches. Stretching from Exmouth in Devon to Studland Bay in Dorset, it’s a prime site for fossil hunting with dinosaur bones and rare fossils discovered by residents and visitors.
  • Steeped in history and culture - Dorset has over 12,000 listed buildings, stately homes, Iron Age hill forts, Roman remains and an array of castles - Corfe, Sherborne, Portland and Lulworth to name a few. The world-renowned author Thomas Hardy spent most of his life in Dorset and his work was based on rural life in the County. His former home, Max Gate, on the outskirts of Dorchester, is open to the public, as is Cloud’s Hill in Wareham, T. E. Lawrence’s ("Lawrence of Arabia") cottage.
  • Quintessential rural British beauty - With 40% of the county designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, there’s no shortage of countryside charm. In 2013, Brownsea Island was voted Britain’s favourite nature reserve and there are many country parks to walk or cycle, including Moors Valley Country Park and Upton Country Park. Shaftesbury’s iconic cobbled Gold Hill was made famous after being featured in the 1970s Hovis advert. With its idyllic thatched cottages and scenic views, the steep hill has since become one of the most photographed streets in Britain.
  • Local cuisine - Agriculture is the county’s largest industry and its mild climate and highly fertile soil are optimal for growing high quality produce. Did you know that the Dorset Naga is one of the hottest chili’s in the world? Dorset is well known for its seafood delicacies, with fresh fish caught from its many harbours daily with Weymouth playing host to one of the largest food festivals in the country, the Dorset Seafood Festival, previously attended by Jonathan Ross and celebrity chef Mark Hix.
  • Transport links - You can travel straight into London’s Waterloo station from Weymouth via Dorset towns including Dorchester, Poole and Bournemouth. Fly to over 30 global destinations from Bournemouth Airport or explore the Channel Islands directly from Poole. International cruises also set sail from Poole Harbour.
  • Thriving businesses – The county is home to incredible international and national business that thrive whilst nestled amongst the picturesque scenery. Sunseeker, Siemens, Farrow and Ball and Conker Gin to name a few. But it’s not all about being big, the county has an array of independent small businesses that form part of an amazing business community.

If you’re looking to relocate to Dorset, we have an ever-changing collection of stunning properties available on our properties for sale page

Added: 19th March 2021

Sherborne AbbeyWimborneGold Hill, Shaftesbury